Bacteria alive (more or less) in 86-million-year-old seabed clay

Opening the Sediment Core Hans R?pens a sediment core. The mud in the opening of this core is from the last ice age 10,000 years ago. The mud sampled from the Knorr was from the time when dinosaurs walked the earth. Bo Barker J?nsen/ Science/AAAS With no meal for 86 million years, and barely enough oxygen to sustain metabolism, can a single-celled organism really be considered alive? Yes, but only just, according to a new study. A microbial community buried under the ocean floor since the mid-Jurassic era is still hanging on. Their tenacity could pose some interesting questions for the hunt for alien life. Plenty of microbes live beneath ocean sediments - about 90 percent of the planet's unicellular organisms are found there, and they've long been subjects of study among biologists interested in extreme environments. Hans R?nd colleagues wanted to dig even deeper to examine the most barren places, where food supplies are scarce or nonexistent and where oxygen barely reaches. R?nd colleagues from Denmark and

Bacteria alive (more or less) in 86-million-year-old seabed clay

(Phys.org) -- A new study by scientists from Denmark and Germany has found live bacteria trapped in red clay deposited on the ocean floor some 86 million years ago. The bacteria use miniscule ...

Fri 18 May 12 from Phys.org

Deep-sea bacteria redefine life in the slow lane

Thu 17 May 12 from Discover Magazine

Deep-sea bacteria redefine life in the slow lane, Thu 17 May 12 from Discover Magazine

Slo-mo microbes extend the frontiers of life

Community in the deep seabed uses so little oxygen that it is no longer clear where the lower bound for life lies.

Thu 17 May 12 from Nature News

Barely Breathing Microbes Still Living in 86-Million-Year-Old Clay

Organisms deep beneath the sea floor survive on miniscule amounts of oxygen

Thu 17 May 12 from Science Now

Scientists find life on the sea bed that's 86 million years old and hasn't eaten since the age of dinosaurs

The hardy bacteria scientists from Aarhus University in Denmark found at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean can almost live without food.

Wed 23 May 12 from Daily Mail

Deep-sea microbes live life in the extremely slow lane

Samples from the depths of the Pacific appear to be almost dead, but scientists say they could help in the search for life on other planets.Had enough of life in the fast lane and looking to ...

Sat 19 May 12 from L.A. Times

Slow-Mo Microbes Still Living (Barely) off Dino-era "Lunch Box"

Buried for 86 million years, a bacterial community lives so slugglishly it's still surviving on a "lunch box" from dino days, a new study says.

Thu 17 May 12 from National Geographic

Buried Since the Jurassic Era, Ocean Microbes Are Still 'Barely Alive'

Opening the Sediment Core Hans R?pens a sediment core. The mud in the opening of this core is from the last ice age 10,000 years ago. The mud sampled from the Knorr was from the time when dinosaurs ...

Thu 17 May 12 from Popular Science

It's (just barely, sort of) alive!

Below the ocean floor, microbes are surviving on 100,000 oxygen molecules a day.

Thu 17 May 12 from Ars Technica

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