Alvin, the Deep Sea Research Sub, Has Spread Invasive Species in the Ocean

Marine scientists studying life around deep-sea vents have discovered that some hardy species can survive the extreme change in pressure that occurs when a research submersible rises to the surface. The team's findings, published in Conservation Biology, reveal how a species can be inadvertently carried by submersibles to new areas, with potentially damaging effects on marine ecosystems.

ScienceShot: Hitchhikers From the Deep

Researchers may be inadvertently transferring deep-sea creatures from one hydrothermal vent system to another

Thu 24 May 12 from Science Now

Deep sea animals stowaway on submarines and reach new territory

Marine scientists studying life around deep-sea vents have discovered that some hardy species can survive the extreme change in pressure that occurs when a research submersible rises to the ...

Thu 24 May 12 from Phys.org

Deep sea animals stowaway on submarines and reach new territory, Thu 24 May 12 from Biology News

Warning over deep-ocean stowaways

Care must be taken not to spread deep-sea creatures around the world during exploration of the remote ocean floor, scientists caution.

Wed 23 May 12 from BBC News

Deep sea creatures may be hitchhiking on scientific gear

The world's most famous research sub may have inadvertently been carrying invasive species between the deep-water sites it has spent decades studying.  Read more

Wed 23 May 12 from Nature News Blogs

Deep Creatures Hitchhike on Subs--Invading Pristine Habitats?

Despite huge pressure changes, "Energizer bunny" animals keep going and going and going--possibly invading pristine areas, experts say.

Wed 30 May 12 from National Geographic

Deep-Sea Dive Picks Up Up Extreme-Living Stowaways

Dramatic changes in pressure did not appear to harm hitchhiking mollusks.

Thu 24 May 12 from Livescience

Deep sea life can 'hitchhike' to new areas

CHICAGO, May 24 (UPI) -- U.S. scientists studying life around deep-sea vents say some species have hitchhiked on their submersibles to new areas and may damage ecosystems.

Thu 24 May 12 from UPI

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